Thesis (Ph.D)


Species distribution, abundance and conservation in Nakai-nam Theun National Protected Area, Central-Eastern Laos: Implications for future local wildlife conservation project

Abstract

Southeast Asia is experiencing unprecedented biodiversity declines brought about by human population growth and economic development leading to unsustainable use of  natural  resources  and  loss  of  natural  habitat.  The  scientific  community  has  emphasized this biodiversity crisis in the past decade, calling for immediate action. In this  context,  I  set  my  research  as  a  case  study  in  Nakai-­‐Nam  Theun  National  Protected Area (NNT NPA), central eastern Laos where wildlife hunting has been rampant and management strategy failing to prevent wildlife declines. This research aimed  (1)  to  re-­‐assess  and  bring  forward  the  importance  of  NNT  NPA  for  wildlife  conservation, (2) to identify the key species for which NNT NPA is a priority for their conservation, (3) to use the data collected to develop a long-­‐term project in the area for research and conservation. In addition to this local-­‐level case study, I aimed (4) to identify the National near-­‐future priorities for research and conservation of Lao non-­‐human primates (primates). For the latter, I reviewed the literature for the most reliable occurrence localities of Lao primate species across the country to model their potential distribution. I used the models to re-­‐assess their current status and identify the remaining gaps in our knowledge that need to be addressed. For the research in NNT NPA, I collected baseline data on key species occurrence and threats within the area. From January 2011 to March 2012, I conducted transect surveys in 10 different sites in the area. At each site, I set four to 20 transects, each replicated up to three times.  During  the  transect  walks  I  recorded  all  diurnal  primate  species  sighted.  In  addition, I used the camera-­trap database of 2006 management staff. Using modelling softwares (MAXENT, ENFA, DISTANCE) to provide baseline predictions, I analysed both my transect survey and the camera-­‐trap survey data  to  assess  the  current  status  and  distribution  of  red-­‐shanked  doucs  (Pygathrix  nemaeus), four macaque species (Macaca arctoides, M. assamensis, M. leonina, M. mulatta),  small-­‐carnivores  (i.e.  Viveridae,  Prionodontidae,  Herpestidae  and  Mustelidae), small medium-­‐sized cat species and muntjacs species (Muntiacus spp.) occurring in the area. Southeast Asia is experiencing unprecedented biodiversity declines brought about by human population growth and economic development leading to unsustainable use of  natural  resources  and  loss  of  natural  habitat.  The  scientific  community  has  emphasized this biodiversity crisis in the past decade, calling for immediate action. In this  context,  I  set  my  research  as  a  case  study  in  Nakai-­‐Nam  Theun  National  Protected Area (NNT NPA), central eastern Laos where wildlife hunting has been rampant and management strategy failing to prevent wildlife declines. This research aimed  (1)  to  re-­‐assess  and  bring  forward  the  importance  of  NNT  NPA  for  wildlife  conservation, (2) to identify the key species for which NNT NPA is a priority for their conservation, (3) to use the data collected to develop a long-­‐term project in the area for research and conservation. In addition to this local-­‐level case study, I aimed (4) to identify the National near-­‐future priorities for research and conservation of Lao non-­‐human primates (primates). For the latter, I reviewed the literature for the most reliable occurrence localities of Lao primate species across the country to model their potential distribution. I used the models to re-­‐assess their current status and identify the remaining gaps in our knowledge that need to be addressed. For the research in NNT NPA, I collected baseline data on key species occurrence and threats within the area. From January 2011 to March 2012, I conducted transect surveys in 10 different sites in the area. At each site, I set four to 20 transects, each replicated up to three times.  During  the  transect  walks  I  recorded  all  diurnal  primate  species  sighted.  In  addition, I used the camera-­‐trap database of 2006-­‐ management staff. Using modelling softwares (MAXENT, ENFA, DISTANCE) to provide baseline predictions, I analysed both my transect survey and the camera-­‐trap survey data  to  assess  the  current  status  and  distribution  of  red-­‐shanked  doucs  (Pygathrix  nemaeus), four macaque species (Macaca arctoides, M. assamensis, M. leonina, M. mulatta),  small-­‐carnivores  (i.e.  Viveridae,  Prionodontidae,  Herpestidae  and  Mustelidae), small medium-­‐sized cat species and muntjacs species (Muntiacus spp.) occurring in the area. Southeast Asia is experiencing unprecedented biodiversity declines brought about by human population growth and economic development leading to unsustainable use of  natural  resources  and  loss  of  natural  habitat.  The  scientific  community  has  emphasized this biodiversity crisis in the past decade, calling for immediate action. In this  context,  I  set  my  research  as  a  case  study  in  Nakai-­‐Nam  Theun  National  Protected Area (NNT NPA), central eastern Laos where wildlife hunting has been rampant and management strategy failing to prevent wildlife declines. This research aimed  (1)  to  re-­‐assess  and  bring  forward  the  importance  of  NNT  NPA  for  wildlife  conservation, (2) to identify the key species for which NNT NPA is a priority for their conservation, (3) to use the data collected to develop a long-­‐term project in the area for research and conservation. In addition to this local-­‐level case study, I aimed (4) to identify the National near-­‐future priorities for research and conservation of Lao non-­‐human primates (primates). For the latter, I reviewed the literature for the most reliable occurrence localities of Lao primate species across the country to model their potential distribution. I used the models to re-­‐assess their current status and identify the remaining gaps in our knowledge that need to be addressed. For the research in NNT NPA, I collected baseline data on key species occurrence and threats within the area. From January 2011 to March 2012, I conducted transect surveys in 10 different sites in the area. At each site, I set four to 20 transects, each replicated up to three times.  During  the  transect  walks  I  recorded  all  diurnal  primate  species  sighted.  In  addition, I used the camera-­‐trap database of 2006-­‐ management staff. Using modelling softwares (MAXENT, ENFA, DISTANCE) to provide baseline predictions, I analysed both my transect survey and the camera-­‐trap survey data  to  assess  the  current  status  and  distribution  of  red-­‐shanked  doucs  (Pygathrix  nemaeus), four macaque species (Macaca arctoides, M. assamensis, M. leonina, M. mulatta),  small-­‐carnivores  (i.e.  Viveridae,  Prionodontidae,  Herpestidae  and  Mustelidae), small medium-­‐sized cat species and muntjacs species (Muntiacus spp.) occurring in the area.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier)

Permanent link to this resource: https://doi.org/10.24384/88sg-0894

Attached files

Authors

Coudrat, C

Oxford Brookes departments

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Department of Social Sciences

Dates

Year: 2013


© Coudrat, C
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