Book Chapter


Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people

Abstract

In this chapter, we focus on the emergence of the conscious-clubbing movement and its potential benefits to young adults as a way of spending social time without drinking alcohol. Efforts to promote moderate drinking among young people may be challenging when the environment strongly encourages drinking, but conscious clubbing, which has roots in rave culture and involves dancing without the use of alcohol or other drugs, may offer an alternative. Drawing on literature from the rave scene and the benefits of dancing in a group, we introduce conscious clubbing and how it could bring about meaningful experiences in participants’ lives, while at the same time, reducing the consumption of alcohol, and in doing so, we draw on our own recent survey research. This research illuminates challenges in the acceptability of conscious clubbing to some young people, which we discuss alongside suggestions for new directions for research in this area, at the end of the chapter.

Attached files

Authors

Davies, Emma L.
Smith, Joanne
Johansson, Mattias
Hill, Kimberley
Brown, Kyle

Oxford Brookes departments

Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

Dates

Year of publication: 2019
Date of RADAR deposit: 2019-11-28



All rights reserved.


Related resources

This RADAR resource is the Accepted Manuscript of Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people
This RADAR resource is Part of Young adult drinking styles: Current perspectives on research, policy and practice [ISBN: 9783030286071] / edited by Dominic Conroy and Fiona Measham.

Details

  • Owner: Joseph Ripp
  • Collection: Outputs
  • Version: 1 (show all)
  • Status: Live