The Appointment and Removal of the Head of Government of the Kiribati Republic

Abstract

This report examines the unique arrangements for the appointment and removal of the President of the Pacific state of Kiribati, in the context of political, historical and social factors. It outlines the potential for similar mechanisms to be introduced in the Isle of Man, while remaining aware of the significance of the constitutional, geographical and cultural differences between the two jurisdictions. The report concludes that the dual effect of a vote of no confidence in Kiribati’s model, which triggers not only a new Presidential election but also a fresh general election for the legislature, provides a measure of balance between competing democratic mandates. However it is not the only option, and refinements could be made. Requiring a special majority for a vote of no confidence in the President without triggering a general election may also be considered. Attention should also be paid to identifying the desirable number of presidential candidates, and to how they are to be nominated.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier)

Permanent link to this resource: https://doi.org/10.24384/zw43-2s19

Attached files

Authors

Edge, Peter W
Corrin, Jennifer
de Than, Claire

Contributors

Project Members: Oxford Brookes University; Jersey Law Commission; The University of Queensland Law School

Oxford Brookes departments

School of Law

Dates

Year: 2019


Published by Oxford Brookes University

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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