Journal Article


Experiences of black and minority ethnic (BME) students in higher education: Applying self-determination theory to understand the BME attainment gap

Abstract

British university students from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds are less likely to achieve a ‘good’ degree classification than white students, despite taking prior attainment into account. To examine this gap, the current study conducted focus groups with 17 BME students studying health and social care related subjects to understand their experiences of learning and teaching. This was theoretically informed by self-determination theory, which proposes that achieving one’s full potential for learning, alongside experience of wellbeing, is supported by environments that help individuals to meet their needs for relatedness, competence, and autonomy. Thematic analysis revealed that BME students encountered many obstacles that inhibited their experience of fulfilment of these three needs, which often undermined their initial desire to achieve their full potential. The findings are discussed in light of how universities can support BME students to achieve their full potential, and in doing so, address the BME attainment gap.

Attached files

Authors

Bunce, Louise
King, Naomi
Saran, Sinitta
Taliba, Nabeela

Oxford Brookes departments

Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

Dates

Year of publication: 2019
Date of RADAR deposit: 2019-07-19


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License


Related resources

This RADAR resource is the Accepted Manuscript of Experiences of black and minority ethnic (BME) students in higher education: Applying self-determination theory to understand the BME attainment gap

Details

  • Owner: Joseph Ripp
  • Collection: Outputs
  • Version: 1 (show all)
  • Status: Live