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Dismantlable adhesive joints for decommissioning, repair and upgrade

Adhesive bonding is well established as one the most successful means of joining advanced composite materials, which are increasingly employed to reduce weight and extend service life. It is also well known that adhesives used to sustain structural loads tend to be permanent, cross-linked and irreversible, which raises particular challenges when equipment becomes obsolete or when there is a need for upgrade or repair. This paper reviews the latest published work on dismantlable adhesive technologies, and highlights the criteria needed to evaluate potential disbondable systems. Whilst tailored formulations, originally developed as selfhealing polymers, demonstrate considerable promise for self-repair, re-adjustment and disbonding, it concludes that additives, in the form of expandable reactive agents, offer demonstrable performance and relatively simple adaptation to bonding technology currently employed. These, in conjunction with appropriate design strategies in order to aid design for disassembly, should of…

Type: Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 15:13
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Size and modality effects in Braille learning: Implications for the blind child from pre-reading sighted children

Background. Beginning readers are typically introduced to enlarged print and the size of this print decreases as readers become more fluent. In comparison beginning blind readers are expected to learn standard-sized Braille from the outset because past research suggests letter knowledge cannot be transferred across different sizes of Braille. Aims. The study aims to investigate whether learning Braille using an oversized pegboard, leads to faster, transferable, letter learning and whether performance is mediated by either tactile or visual learning. Sample. Sixty-eight children participated in the study. All children were sighted pre-readers with no previous knowledge of Braille. The children came from two nursery schools with an average age of 47.8 months. Methods. Children were taught specific Braille letters using either an enlarged pegboard or standard Braille. Two other groups of children were taught using visually presented Braille characters in either an enlarged or standard-sized and a further control…

Type: Journal Article/Review
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 12:39
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The deliverance of evil: Utopia and evil

Type: book_section
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 10:27
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Survey of practitioners handling slow lorises (Primates: Nycticebus): an assessment of the harmful effects of slow loris bites

Slow lorises (Nycticebus spp.) are one of six venomous mammals, and the only known venomous primate. In the wild envenomation occurs mainly during conspecific competition for mates and territory, but may also be used as an application against parasites or for predator defense. Envenomation in humans is documented, with the most extreme accounts detailing near-fatal anaphylactic shock. From September 2016 – August 2017, we received questionnaire responses from 80 wild animal practitioners working with Nycticebus spp. in zoos, rescue centres and in the wild. We identified 54 practitioners who had experience of being bitten or were otherwise affected by slow loris venom, and an additional 26 incomplete entries. No fatalities were reported. Fifteen respondents noted that medical intervention was required, 12 respondents indicated no reaction to being bitten (9 of these indicated they were wearing gloves). Symptoms for those affected included: anaphylactic shock, paraesthesia, haematuria, dyspnoea, extreme pain, i…

Type: Journal Article/Review
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 10:26
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Model institutions and the geography of social reform in early Victorian Britain

This article reconsiders the nature and novelty of social reform in Britain during the early Victorian period. Historians have long ceased to debate the period in terms of a ‘revolution in government’, or the beginnings of a welfare state. Instead, the current consensus presents a picture of only modest, fitful change. Neither the state, nor the overall ideological landscape, was radically transformed. This article seeks to reinject a sense of transformative change back into these decades. It does so by examining a neglected facet of this otherwise richly served period of social reform: the formation and functioning of a series of self-styled ‘model’ institutions that spanned the fields of education, prisons, housing and sanitation. In particular, what the use of these model institutions brings into sharp focus are the radical changes that occurred in the geography of social reform, which at this point began to develop according to multiple spatial relations, extending at once within and beyond Britain. Betwe…

Type: Journal Article/Review
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 10:13
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Lived Religion: Rethinking Human Nature in a Neoliberal Age

Type: Journal Article/Review
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 09:56
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Depictions of the “ideal child” in nineteenth-century British literature and legislature

Type: Journal Article/Review
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 09:54
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Factors affecting recruitment and retention of nurses who deliver clinical research: A qualitative study

Aim: To provide a better understanding of the factors affecting recruitment and retention of clinical research nurses. Design: Qualitative exploratory design Methods: An on-line questionnaire comprising open-ended and fixed choice questions was completed by 121 clinical research nurses. Seven focus groups were held across three counties with a subgroup of 26 participants. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Results: Participants were attracted to a research nurse post by an interest in research itself, a desire for a change or to achieve personal objectives. The majority expected to continue in a research nurse post for the next five years while others expected to move on to research management, a clinical post or retirement; few had ambitions to become an independent researcher. Factors identified in focus groups as leading to intentions to leave research included short term contracts, concern about loss of clinical skills, desire for further change, unsupportive employers and limited oppor…

Type: Journal Article/Review
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 09:52
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The Impact of Chronological Age on the Quiet Eye in Youth Development Phase Goalkeepers in a Professional Youth Academy

Whilst there has been much speculation, there remains little clarity regarding what information athletes use to direct decision making in performance settings, and how skill is transferred from training to performance (Michaels and Beek, 1995). The role of perception-action coupling within decision-making in team sports has been widely considered, and there is some consensus that skilled performers are better able to locate and interpret key information determining expertise in a particular skill. The consideration of Quiet Eye (QE) has become increasingly popular in assessing the critical moment in which an action is initiated (Vickers, 1996), and as the consistent perception-action variable in elite performers. Quiet Eye data (onset; offset and location) will be collected in a 1 v 1 dyadic system, with the primary purpose being to understand the impact of chronological age in academy Goalkeepers (13, 15, 18 y/o) against their expert counterparts (Senior Professionals). This research study has implications f…

Type: Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 09:49
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