Journal Article


Towards a psychology of religion and the environment: The good, the bad, and the mechanisms

Abstract

What is the relationship between religion and care for the natural world? Although this question has motivated research for decades, the evidence is inconsistent. Here, we highlight the psychological mechanisms by which specific features of religious systems may differentially impact environmental beliefs and commitments—positively and negatively—to help generate more targeted questions for future research. Religious traditions that emphasize human dominance over the natural world, promote just-world and end-world beliefs, and are tied to more fundamentalist/conservative attitudes can diminish levels of environmental concern in its adherents. Alternatively, religious and spiritual traditions that moralize the protection of the natural world, sanctify nature, and emphasize belief in human stewardship of the natural world can promote pro-environmental concern and commitments.

Attached files

Authors

Preston, Jesse L.
Baimel, Adam

Oxford Brookes departments

Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

Dates

Year of publication: 2020
Date of RADAR deposit: 2020-09-21


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License


Related resources

This RADAR resource is the Accepted Manuscript of Towards a psychology of religion and the environment: The good, the bad, and the mechanisms

Details

  • Owner: Joseph Ripp
  • Collection: Outputs
  • Version: 1 (show all)
  • Status: Live