Journal Article


Ballot papers and the practice of elections: Britain, France and the United States of America, c.1500–2000

Abstract

The humble ballot paper is a defining technology of elections throughout the world. This article interrogates its contested past by demonstrating – over a long period and in the context of three contrasting countries – how and why it emerged in the early modern period and how it was then used, abused and regulated in the context of the expanded, and eventually mass, electoral arenas of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Ironically, by the time that the ballot paper was firmly established, its monopoly was already being challenged by mechanical and then electronic media, which may eventually condemn it to extinction.

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Authors

Crook, M
Crook, T

Oxford Brookes departments

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences\Department of History, Philosophy and Religion

Dates

Year of publication: 2015
Date of RADAR deposit: 2017-05-19


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License


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