Journal Article


Meta-analysis of summertime indoor temperatures in newly-built, retrofitted and existing UK dwellings

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a meta-analysis of hourly indoor summertime temperature datasets gathered during the summer of 2013 (May to September), from 63 dwellings, located across the UK. The sample consisted of unmodified dwellings (existing); dwellings with varying levels of fabric improvements (retrofitted) and dwellings constructed to higher levels of the Code for Sustainable Homes (new). Indoor and outdoor temperature data from bedrooms and living rooms from these homes were collected at five-minute intervals using temperature sensors. These data were processed and analysed for summertime overheating, using both static criteria (CIBSE Guide A) and the criteria associated with the EN15251 adaptive thermal comfort model (CIBSE TM52). The results show that despite a relatively cool summer, sufficiently high temperatures were found in a high proportion of dwellings, which were overheated according to the static criteria, although the prevalence of overheating was found to be much lower when assessed by the adaptive method. Considerably higher temperatures were found in bedrooms, much higher than living rooms. Interestingly, dwellings with higher levels of insulation experienced overheating twice as frequently as uninsulated dwellings. It is necessary to consider the overheating risk during the design and retrofit of homes, to avoid air-conditioning in future.

Attached files

Authors

Gupta, Rajat
Gregg, Matt
Irving, Robert

Oxford Brookes departments

Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment\School of Architecture

Dates

Year of publication: 2019
Date of RADAR deposit: 2019-05-22



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