Journal Article


The event experiences of attendees with food allergies, intolerances and coeliac disease: Risk loaded value-creation/destruction

Abstract

Purpose: For attendees with allergies, intolerances and coeliac disease, accessing safe, nutritious and good quality food and drink is a vital but challenging dimension of events. This study sought to capture and analyse the lived event experiences of individuals with a variety of food–related health, wellbeing and safety needs.   Design/methodology/approach: This study adopted an inductive approach, using semi-structured interviews to gather qualitative data from participants with various food allergies and intolerances, or coeliac disease. Findings: Attendees had low expectations regarding food choice, quality and value, which stemmed from past event experiences. Poor information about suitable food and drink, coupled with frontline staffs’ perceived knowledge, responsiveness and care were frequently seen as sources of service failures. The data stress how exposure to potentially harmful foods and food avoidance influenced attendees’ experiences. The findings also help to appreciate consumers’ agency, identifying various coping strategies used by affected individuals to anticipate risks, engage in compensatory behaviours and mitigate the effects of unsuitable food and drink. Originality: This study is unique in examining the event experiences of individuals with food allergies, intolerances and coeliac disease. It demonstrates how practices in the crucial domain of food and drink provision can affect the overall event experience, with potential consequences at, across and potentially beyond the venue and occasion. From a theoretical perspective, the study conceptualises intersections of risk, value-creation/destruction and experiential consumption. It shows the ‘episodic’ and ‘perpetual’ impacts of ‘risk loaded’ consumption, while arguing that diverse value-creation/destruction practices mediate pathways leading to different experiential outcomes.

Attached files

Authors

Weber, Lina
Lugosi, Peter

Oxford Brookes departments

Oxford Brookes Business School

Dates

Year: 2021


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License


Related resources

This RADAR resource is the Accepted Manuscript of The event experiences of attendees with food allergies, intolerances and coeliac disease: Risk loaded value-creation/destruction

Details

  • Owner: Daniel Croft
  • Collection: Outputs
  • Version: 1 (show all)
  • Status: Live