Journal Article


What factors predict students’ final-year dissertation grades? The results from two small pilot studies

Abstract

Two small pilot studies were conducted to identify factors that might be used to predict students’ performance on their final-year dissertation project. Over the course of these two studies several significant correlations were observed that suggested the characteristics of the student (i.e., conscientiousness, procrastination & grade expectations) and behaviour of their project supervisor (i.e., years of experience & task-oriented supervisory style) were significantly associated with the mark achieved for their dissertation project. In Study 2 it was also found that self-reported procrastination and student’s own grade expectations might be used to predict the mark achieved for their final-year research project. The use of small, self-selected student samples and the timing of questionnaire administration mean that these findings are insufficient to recommend the routine use of these questionnaire measures to identify those at-risk of under-achieving. However, the results from these two pilot studies highlight several variables that might be used in future studies to predict student outcomes on their final-year dissertation.

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Authors

Lonsdale, Adam Jonathan

Oxford Brookes departments

Faculty of Health and Life Sciences\Department of Sport, Health Sciences and Social Work

Dates

Year of publication: 2018
Date of RADAR deposit: 2018-08-03



https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


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This RADAR resource is the Accepted Manuscript of What factors predict students’ final-year dissertation grades? The results from two small pilot studies

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  • Owner: Joseph Ripp
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