Journal Article


Discrimination of small forms in a deviant-detection paradigm by 10-month-old infants

Abstract

Using eye tracking, we investigated if 10-month-old infants could discriminate between members of a set of small forms based on geometric properties in a deviant-detection paradigm, as suggested by the idea of a core cognitive system for Euclidian geometry. We also investigated the precision of infants' ability to discriminate as well as how the discrimination process unfolds over time. Our results show that infants can discriminate between small forms based on geometrical properties, but only when the difference is sufficiently large. Furthermore, our results also show that it takes infants, on average, <3.5 s to detect a deviant form. Our findings extend previous research in three ways: by showing that infants can make similar discriminative judgments as children and adults with respect to geometric properties; by providing a first crude estimate on the limit of the discriminative abilities in infants, and finally; by providing a first demonstration of how the discrimination process unfolds over time.

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Authors

Lindskog, Marcus
Rogell, Maria
Kenward, Ben
Gredebäck, Gustaf

Oxford Brookes departments

Department of Sport, Health Sciences and Social Work

Dates

Year of publication: 2019
Date of RADAR deposit: 2020-01-29


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License


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