Journal Article


Development and thyroid hormone dependence of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function towards birth

Abstract

Birth is a significant metabolic challenge with exposure to a pro-oxidant environment and the increased energy demands for neonatal survival. This study investigated the development of mitochondrial density and activity in ovine biceps femoris skeletal muscle during the perinatal period and examined the role of thyroid hormones in these processes. Muscle capacity for oxidative phosphorylation increased primarily after birth but was accompanied by prepartum increases in mitochondrial density and abundance of electron transfer system (ETS) complexes I-IV and ATP synthase as well as by neonatal upregulation of uncoupling proteins. This temporal disparity between prepartum maturation and neonatal upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative capacity may protect against oxidative stress associated with birth while ensuring energy availability to the neonate. Fetal thyroid hormone deficiency reduced oxidative phosphorylation and prevented the prepartum upregulation of mitochondrial density and ETS proteins in fetal skeletal muscle. Overall, the data shows that mitochondrial function matures over the perinatal period and is dependent on thyroid hormones, with potential consequences for neonatal viability and adult metabolic health.

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Authors

Davies, K.L.
Camm, E.J.
Atkinson, E.V.
Lopez, T.
Forhead, Alison J.
Murray, A.J.
Fowden, AL

Oxford Brookes departments

Department of Biological and Medical Sciences

Dates

Year of publication: 2020
Date of RADAR deposit: 2020-02-12


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License


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