Conference Paper


Analysis of action oriented effects on perceptual process of object recognition using physiological responses

Abstract

Action on any objects provides perceptual information about the environment. There is a significant evidence that human visual system responds to action possibilities in an image as perceiving any ones action stimulates human motor system. However very limited studies have been done to analyze the effect of object affordance during action perception and execution. To study the effect of object affordance on human perception, in this paper we have analyzed the human brain signals using EEG based oscillatory activity of brain. EEG responses corresponding to images of objects shown with correct, incorrect and without grips are examined. Exploration of different gripping effects has been done by extracting Alpha and Beta frequency bands using Discrete Wavelet Transform based band extraction method, then baseline normalized power of Alpha and Beta frequency bands at 24 positions of motor area of left and right side of brain are examined. The result shows that 12 pooled electrodes at central and central parietal region provides a clear discrimination among the three gripping cases in terms of calculated power. The presented research explores new applicabilities of object affordance to develop a variety of Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based devices and to improve motor imagery ability among motor disorder related patients.

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Authors

Sharma, Shanu
Mishra, Anju
Kumar, Sanjay
Ranjan, Priya
Ujlayan, Amit

Oxford Brookes departments

Faculty of Health and Life Sciences\Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

Dates

Year of publication: 2018
Date of RADAR deposit: 2018-08-21


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License


Related resources

This RADAR resource is the Accepted Manuscript of Analysis of action oriented effects on perceptual process of object recognition using physiological responses

Details

  • Owner: Joseph Ripp
  • Collection: Outputs
  • Version: 1 (show all)
  • Status: Live