Journal Article


Young British partisan attitudes to negative election campaign advertising: a tri-party perspective

Abstract

This article presents an empirical investigation of young partisan first-time voter attitudes toward the use of negative attack advertising in a British general election. Partisanship, particularly in relation to negative advertising and third-party effects, is significantly under-researched, yet it advances understanding of youth electoral interaction. Our study confirms that young British partisans are not passive recipients of information, but are actively involved in information processing, interpretation, and counter arguing. Our findings also highlight a third-party effect among young partisans in their evaluation of the attack advertising. Overall our young partisans broadly reject image-attack election ads, which raises a “health warning” on its use in future election campaigning. The findings of this study are of significant interest to election campaign strategists in their planning for future elections and to political researchers striving to advance understanding within the field of political marketing.

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Authors

Dermody, Janine
Hanmer-Lloyd, Stuart
Koenig-Lewis, Nicole
Zhao, Anita Lifen

Oxford Brookes departments

Faculty of Business\Department of Marketing

Dates

Year of publication: 2015
Date of RADAR deposit: 2017-11-16


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License


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