Journal Article


The plant endoplasmic reticulum: An organized chaos of tubules and sheets with multiple functions

Abstract

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a fascinating organelle at the core of the secretory pathway. It is responsible for the synthesis of one third of the cellular proteome and, in plant cells, it produces receptors and transporters of hormones as well as the proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of critical components of a cellulosic cell wall. The ER structure resembles a spider-web network of interconnected tubules and cisternae that pervades the cell. The study of the dynamics and interaction of this organelles with other cellular structures such as the plasma membrane, the Golgi apparatus and the cytoskeleton, have been permitted by the implementation of fluorescent protein and advanced confocal imaging. In this review, we report on the findings that contributed toward the understanding of the ER morphology and function with the aid of fluorescent proteins, focusing on the contributions provided by pioneering work from the lab of the late Professor Chris Hawes.

Attached files

Authors

Kriechbaumer, Verena
Brandizzi, Federica

Oxford Brookes departments

Department of Biological and Medical Sciences

Dates

Year of publication: 2020
Date of RADAR deposit: 2020-05-14


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License


Related resources

This RADAR resource is the Version of Record of The plant endoplasmic reticulum: An organized chaos of tubules and sheets with multiple functions

Details

  • Owner: Joseph Ripp
  • Collection: Outputs
  • Version: 1 (show all)
  • Status: Live