Journal Article


Children's understanding of when a person's confidence and hesitancy is a cue to their credibility

Abstract

The most readily-observable and influential cue to one’s credibility is their confidence. Although one’s confidence correlates with knowledge, one should not always trust confident sources or disregard hesitant ones. Three experiments (N = 662; 3- to 12-year-olds) examined the developmental trajectory of children’s understanding of ‘calibration’: whether a person’s confidence or hesitancy correlates with their knowledge. Experiments 1 and 2 provide evidence that children use a person’s history of calibration to guide their learning. Experiments 2 and 3 revealed a developmental progression in calibration understanding: Children preferred a well calibrated over a miscalibrated confident person by around 4 years, whereas even 7- to 8-year olds were insensitive to calibration in hesitant people. The widespread implications for social learning, impression formation, and social cognition are discussed.

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Authors

Birch, Susan A.J.
Severson, Rachel L.
Baimel, Adam

Oxford Brookes departments

Department of Psychology, Health and Professional Development

Dates

Year of publication: 2020
Date of RADAR deposit: 2019-12-19


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License


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