'I just think something like the ‘Bubs and Pubs’ class is what men should be having’: Paternal subjectivities and preparing for first-time fatherhood in Australia and the United Kingdom."


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Citation
Miller, T. and Nash, M. (2017) ''I just think something like the ‘Bubs and Pubs’ class is what men should be having’: Paternal subjectivities and preparing for first-time fatherhood in Australia and the United Kingdom."', Journal of Sociology, 53 (3) pp. 541-556.

Abstract
Increasingly in international research and popular media a growing interest in men and fatherhood is discernible. These changes occur as other aspects of the socio-economic world shift, necessitating the need to re-address how caring and paid work responsibilities are configured and practised. However, interest in men’s experiences as fathers has emerged in ways which reflect cultural assumptions and practices associated with dominant understandings of masculinities. Consequently, research and evidence of changing behaviours has been culturally and geographically uneven. In this paper, two qualitative studies are drawn upon to examine how men living in Australia and the UK engage in/narrate experiences of preparation for first-time fatherhood. These studies compare men’s in-depth accounts of preparing for first-time fatherhood in cultures where understandings of masculinities overlap, but where differences are also discernible. The findings illuminate the ways in which biology, gender, temporality and histories of masculinities frame men’s preparation activities and service provision.

AuthorsT Miller
M Nash
FacultyFaculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Keywordsfatherhood, gender, masculinity, pregnancy, Tasmania, United Kingdom
DOI10.1177/1440783316667638
Identifiershttps://doi.org/10.1177/1440783316667638
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1440783316667638

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