Learning and Teaching

  • Brookes Learning and Teaching Conference (6)
    Resources developed for the annual Oxford Brookes Learning and Teaching Conference
  • Brookes Virtual Help (213)
    A series of videos and documents to help students and staff use Brookes Virtual.
  • Cartoons by Bob Pomfret (109)
    A collection of cartoons for a wide range of projects in the university drawn by Bob Pomfret in the Media Workshop
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    Everything you need to know about RADAR: instruction guides, videos and photos.
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    This collection synthesises outputs from the JISC Learner Experiences of e-Learning programme
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    The full collection of resources developed by staff from the Learning Resources department at Oxford Brookes University
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    Publicly available teaching resources developed by staff at Oxford Brookes University
  • Past Examination Papers (528)
    Oxford Brookes University past examination papers, for undergraduate and taught postgraduate courses, taken since the 2015/2016 academic year
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    Teaching resources created by Oxford Brookes staff, restricted to staff and students
  • 2012 Legacies for Learning (166)
    Resources which can support higher education programmes in engaging students in learning through opportunities afforded by the Olympic and Paralympic Games and their legacy.
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1 to 10 of 2,292

History of Medicine #10: The Rise of the Global Health Consultant: Brian Abel Smith (1926-1996)

For more than forty years, Brian Abel-Smith, a health economist and political adviser, was closely involved with the development of health and social welfare policies worldwide. From his seminal research with Claude Guillebaud on the cost of the British National Health Service in the 1950s, he quickly developed an international reputation as a consultant who could be relied upon to produce useful reports with speed and efficiency. His research centred on the determinants of health, health service planning and financing, population control and poverty. He pioneered international comparisons on health services finance for the World Health Organisation in 1958, and completed numerous assignments in over 80 countries - ranging from short reports to (in the case of Mauritius) the creation of a fully-fledged social welfare system. From 1983-86 he was senior adviser to the WHO Director-General Halfdan Mahler on the economic strategy for the Health For All (by the year 2000) programme. This talk will use Abel-Smith’s…

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 15:58
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Moments In Medicine #1: The History of Fat

Elizabeth Hurren, Senior Lecturer in History of Medicine and Jeya Henry, Professor of Human Nutrition examine the history of body fat, body image and nutrition and trace developments contributing to obesity today. Interviewed by Lizz Pearson, well known by her work for BBC Radio 4, the programmme includes the responses of 13 year old girls from Bristol, to the question, is it possible to be both Fat and Fit? Produced by Apercu Media. The first in a series of History of Medicine podcasts from the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Past and Present.

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 15:54
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Moments In Medicine #4: Sickle-Cell Research

Sickle-Cell is a condition affecting more than 15,000 people in the UK - twice the number of cystic-fibrosis. However, some campaigners fear that the ethnic background of sufferers is a major factor in the relatively low level of funding and poor awareness of the condition. In Moments in Medicine Nick Baker talks to Professor Elizabeth Anionwu at Thames Valley University, Iyamide Thomas at the Sickle Cell Society and sufferer Anne Welsh to discover whether race really does play a role in medical research. Produced by Apercu Media. The fourth in a series of History of Medicine podcasts from the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Past and Present.

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 15:51
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History of Medicine #1: The Open Air School Movement in the first half of the Twentieth Century: A "non-evidenced based" experiment in social health

The Open Air School Movement was a major public health initiative created within the Western World in the first half of the 20th century. Open air nursery and primary schools were introduced in the first decade of the century throughout Europe and North America and over the next 20-30 years became numerous and widespread. This paper examines the influences behind the Open Air school movement predating the influential School opened in Charlottenberg, Germany in 1904 and the working philosophy of these schools both in relation to health and more generally. It also documents the day to day working practices of the schools, their changing role as they were affected by changes in treatment and prevention of infectious disease and their subsequent decline and closure after the 2nd world war. The School movement is examined in the context of a more general social health agenda with particular emphasis on the ideas of “fresh air “ providing a desirable and healthy environment as a method of ( particularly ) control a…

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 15:47
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History of Medicine #22: Send in the Clones? Naomi Mitchison (née Haldane)’s Musing on Reproduction, Breeding, Feminism, Socialism and Eugenics from the 1920s to the 1970s

In this seminar Lesley Hall investigates the relationship between feminism and eugenics through the fascinating lens of Naomi Mitchison’s fiction. JBS Haldane’s sister, and very much situated at the centre of the eugenic and literary movements of her time, Naomi Mitchison was a prolific author writing path braking historical fiction amongst other works before turning to Science Fiction. Scrutinizing her personal and political lives, this seminar focuses on three of Mitchison’s postwar works in relation to perceptions of breeding and reproduction, namely Memoirs of a Spacewomen (1962), Solution 3 (1975), and Not by Bread Alone (1983). This seminar took place at Oxford Brookes University on 13 November 2012.

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 14:25
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History of Medicine #20: Eugenics and Maternalism during the Century of Woman: Trends in Eastern Europe

In the larger context of arguing for recasting the twentieth century as ‘the century of woman’, this seminar seeks to highlight the role eugenics played in relationship to maternalism as an example of women’s integration in state making and modernization policies. This seminar took place at Oxford Brookes University on 16 October 2012

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 14:16
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Moments In Medicine #5: From Eugenics to Newgenics

Eugenics is a term we associate with atrocities, but today gene therapy and fertility treatments are preventing disease and alleviating suffering. Where should we draw the line? Paul Weindling, Research Professor of History of Medicine, Roger Griffin, Professor of Modern History from Oxford Brookes, Dr. Marcus Pembrey, clinical geneticist from the Institute of Child Health, London and Emma Lake, Expert Patient Advisor for the Cystic Fibrosis Trust and CF sufferer talk to Lizz Pearson about the link between today's genetic technologies and the eugenics of the past. Produced by Apercu Media. The fifth in a series of History of Medicine podcasts from the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Past and Present.

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 14:06
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Moments In Medicine #8: The Vaccination Debate

Professor Michael Worboys, University of Manchester; Dr. Helen Bedford, Institute of Child Health UCL and Dr. Richard Halvorsen, a GP working in central London discuss the rights of the individual vs the greater good of the community in the history of vaccination.

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 14:01
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History of Medicine #12: Karl Sudhoff

In this seminar Claudia Stein, Director of the Centre for the History of Medicine at the University of Warwick, offers her fascinating insights into the life and work of Karl Sudhoff and his lasting import on the establishment of the history of medicine as an academic field along with that of his successor Karl Sigerist. The seminar also detailed the seminal but often neglected 1911 International Hygiene Exhibit in Dresden organised by Karl Lingner, discussing its relevance as a microcosm of the various perceptions of, and approaches to, public health and medicine. This seminar took place at Oxford Brookes University

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 13:54
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History of Medicine #24: Suitable for Parenthood: The Eugenics of Reproductive Health in Mid-Twentieth-Century Britain

In this seminar Gayle Davis shifts the conceptual framework from characterizations of pregnant women and motherhood more widely to those of women whose pregnancy aspirations required medical assistance, and the degree to which their desire for children was pathologised by medical professionals in postwar Britain. Offering a remarkable insight into the longevity of eugenic paradigms with regards to selecting donors for artificial insemination procedures, and the social perception thereof, the seminar also critically investigates the Feversham Committee of the 1950s and the context informing the often critical views of practitioners questioning the motives of both the would-be mother and would-be donor father. This seminar took place at Oxford Brookes University on 11 December 2012.

Status: Live|Last updated:19 June 2018 11:56
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