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Electronic cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid for patients with cancer: Beliefs and behaviours of clinicians in the UK

Objectives. To explore UK clinicians’ beliefs and behaviours around recommending e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid for patients with cancer. Design. Cross-sectional online survey. Setting. England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Participants. Clinicians involved in the care of patients with cancer. Primary and secondary outcomes. Behavioural Change Wheel capability, opportunity and motivation to perform a behaviour, knowledge, beliefs, current practice around e-cigarettes and other smoking cessation practices. Method. Clinicians (n=506) completed an online survey to assess beliefs and behaviours around e-cigarettes and other smoking cessation practices for patients with cancer. Behavioural factors associated with recommending e-cigarettes in practice were assessed. Results. 29% of clinicians would not recommend e-cigarettes to patients with cancer who continue to smoke. Factors associated with recommendation include smoking cessation knowledge (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.44) and e-cigarette …

Type: journal article
Creators: Brett, Jo; Davies, Emma L.; Matley, Fiona; Aveyard, Paul; Wells, Mary; Foxcroft, David; Nicholson, Brian; De Minor-Silva, Shiroma; Sinclair, Lesley; Jakes, Sarah; Watson, Eila;
Year: 2020
Access: openAccess
Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 4:41 PM
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Acceptability of alcohol-free dance in place of traditional alcohol-focused events

Objective: Alcohol misuse prevention often fails to account for or replace the pleasurable benefits of drinking such as relaxing and socialising with friends. Increasingly, alcohol free dance music events are emerging, allowing people to gain the positive outcomes of dancing without recourse to alcohol. This study sought to explore whether conscious-clubbing would be rated as an acceptable alternative to traditional alcohol-focused events. Design/Setting: An online cross-sectional survey was completed by 281 young respondents (80.4% female; mean age = 22). Method: Health-related cognitions (attitudes, intentions), perceived acceptability towards alcohol free dance events and the extent to which these were predicted by demographics and individual differences were assessed in the survey. Results: T-tests indicated overall positive attitudes, acceptability, support towards and intention to attend alcohol-free clubbing events regardless of drinking status, with the exception of drinkers’ intentions to attend …

Type: journal article
Creators: Brown, Kyle; Hill, Kimberley; Smith, Joanne; Johansson, Mattias; Davies, Emma L.;
Year: 2020
Access: postEmbargoOpenAccess
Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 4:26 PM
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The path less traveled

The chapter offers an overview of key insights emerging from the five case studies. We return to our central findings and invite readers to review them in the light of their own context and through the lens of school leader, teacher, and researcher. The chapter concludes with comments from both authors, tracing their starting point with each school and their insights at the end of the research process, as they look towards the future.

Type: book part
Creators: Spiro, Jane; Crisfield, Eowyn;
Year: 2018
Access: embargoedAccess
Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 3:37 PM
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Europe Japan Research Centre Podcasts

For over two decades, the Europe-Japan Research Centre (EJRC) has brought distinguished guest speakers to Oxford to present on a broad range of topics in Japanese studies. From literature and film, to anthropology and religious studies, EJRC speakers showcase a range of perspectives on Japanese culture, revealing its complexity while making it accessible. The EJRC seminar series is supported by the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 1:59 PM
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Transnational Kinship in the Margins of Citizenship: The Case of Nikkei Brazilians in Japan

Kinship is a restrictive and yet mutable logic by which many nation-states in East Asia nationalize transnational mobility today. This talk elucidates the seemingly paradoxical but deeply systemic stratification of citizenship intensified by kinship-based migrations, by examining the case of Brazilians in contemporary Japan. At first glance, the kin-based incorporation connotes acceptance: “they” are “us.” Yet the partial inclusion grounded on the idiom of blood ironically preserves perpetual exclusion of those migrants who must seek belonging in a corporeal idiom of family. [NOTE: original presentation contained an 8min video in Porteugeuse with English Subtitles. This part has been edited from the audio pending permission from those involved in the video] Suma Ikeuchi is Assistant Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of California Santa Barbara. Her first book, "Jesus Loves Japan: Return Migration and Global Pentecostalism in the Brazilian Diaspora", wa…

Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 12:40 PM
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Producing People Who Have No One: Child Welfare and Well-Being in Japan

Child welfare and well-being are fragile kin to each other. Such is the case in Japan, where the ethnographic data for this paper originate, but also across the world, as policy makers, caregivers, and people with experience in state care endeavor to imagine—and implement—child welfare systems that truly support well-being. Despite these efforts, social welfare systems too often “produce people who have no one,” in the words of one of my interlocutors. Child welfare policy and practice institutionalize particular visions of kinship relationships, with lasting effects on the people touched by these systems. Some of these systems cultivate the possibility for lasting relationships, and some do not. Relationships can injure and harm, but they can also transform. What are the conditions for a welfare system that nurtures well-being, that produces people who have people? This paper explores how cultural norms surrounding kinship, many deeply connected to national ideologies of Japanese identity, play out when kins…

Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 12:39 PM
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Library help guides for students of English Literature, Drama & Creative Writing

These guides are aimed at Oxford Brookes BA and MA students and will help you use library resources for English Literature, Drama & Creative Writing essays and research.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 11:57 AM
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Informing National Health Service patients about participation in clinical research: A comparison of opt-in and opt-out approaches across the United Kingdom

Objective: Recruitment to clinical research in the NHS remains challenging. One barrier is accessing patients to discuss research participation. Two general approaches are used in the UK to facilitate this: an ‘opt-in’ approach (when clinicians communicate research opportunities to patients) and an ‘opt-out’ approach (all patients have the right to be informed of relevant research opportunities). No evidence-based data are available, however, to inform the decision about which approach is preferable. This study aimed to collect information from ‘opt-in’ and ‘opt-out’ Trusts and identify which of the two approaches is optimal for ensuring NHS patients are given opportunities to discuss research participation. Method: This sequential mixed methods study comprised three phases: (1) an Appreciative Inquiry across UK Trusts, and (2) online surveys and (3) focus groups with NHS staff and patients at a representative mental health Trust. Results: The study was conducted between June and October 2019. Out of sev…

Type: journal article
Creators: Henshall, Catherine; Potts, Jennifer; Walker, Sophie; Hancock, Mark; Underwood, Mark; Broughton, Nick; Ede, Roger; Kernot, Catherine; O’Neill, Lorcan; Geddes, John R.; Cipriani, Andrea;
Year: 2020
Access: openAccess
Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 11:46 AM
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African literature and the CIA: Networks of authorship and publishing

During the period of decolonisation in Africa, the CIA subsidised a number of African authors, editors and publishers as part of its anti-communist covert propaganda strategy. Managed by two front organisations, the Congress of Cultural Freedom and the Farfield Foundation, its Africa programme stretched across the continent, with hubs in Ibadan, Kampala, Nairobi, Cape Town and Johannesburg. This book unravels the hidden networks and associations underpinning African literary publishing in the 1960s; it investigates the success of the CIA in disrupting and infiltrating African literary magazines and publishing firms, and determines the extent to which new circuits of cultural and literary power emerged. Based on new archival evidence relating to the Transcription Centre, The Classic and The New African, it includes case studies of Wole Soyinka, Nat Nakasa and Bessie Head, which assess how their literary careers were influenced by these transnational literary institutions, and their response to these interventi…

Type: book
Creators: Davis, Caroline;
Year: Not yet published.
Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 11:14 AM
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African literature and the CIA: Networks of authorship and publishing. Introduction

Type: book part
Creators: Davis, Caroline;
Year: Not yet published.
Access: metadataOnlyAccess
Status: Live|Last updated:November 24, 2020 11:14 AM
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