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RADAR 10th anniversary video

A video of contemporary academic and administrative staff at Oxford Brookes University talking about how they use RADAR, the institutional repository of Oxford Brookes, to support their teaching, research, and other types of work.

Access: openAccess
Type: video
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 3:17 PM
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RADAR 10th anniversary posters

A collection of posters describing various uses and features of RADAR, the institutional repository of Oxford Brookes, as part of the 10th anniversary celebrations of RADAR.

Access: openAccess
Type: image
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 3:16 PM
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The experiences and supportive care needs of UK patients with pancreatic cancer: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey

Objectives. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have the poorest survival prognosis of any cancer. This survey aimed to describe their experiences of care and supportive care needs to inform future service provision. Design. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of pancreatic cancer patients in the UK. Setting. Individuals at any stage along the care pathway were recruited via five NHS sites in the UK, and online, from January to June 2018. Participants. 274 individuals completed the questionnaire (78% (215) were completed online). Approximately half of participants were diagnosed within the last year (133/274). Of 212 providing gender details, 82 were male and 130 female. Ninety percent (192/213) described themselves as White British. Primary Outcome Measures. Experiences of communication and information; involvement in treatment decisions; supportive care needs. Results. Communication with, and care received from, clinical staff were generally reported positively. However, 29% (75/260) of respondents…

Access: openAccess
Type: journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 3:10 PM
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Low-level carbon monoxide exposure affects BOLD fMRI signal

Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) fMRI is a common technique for measuring brain activation that could be affected by low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure from e.g. smoking. This study aimed to probe the vulnerability of BOLD fMRI to CO and determine whether it may constitute a significant neuroimaging confound. Low-level (6ppm exhaled) CO effects on BOLD response were assessed in 12 healthy never-smokers on two separate experimental days (CO and air control). fMRI tasks were breath-holds (hypercapnia), visual stimulation and fingertapping. BOLD fMRI response was lower during breath holds, visual stimulation and fingertapping in the CO protocol compared to the air control protocol. Behavioural and physiological measures remained unchanged. We conclude that BOLD fMRI might be vulnerable to changes in baseline CO, and suggest exercising caution when imaging populations exposed to elevated CO levels. Further work is required to fully elucidate the impact on CO on fMRI and its underlying mechanisms.

Access: metadataOnlyAccess
Type: journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 2:54 PM
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Using legal databases to find journal articles

This video explains the importance of journal articles for law students, then demonstrates searching for them on Westlaw, LexisLibrary and HeinOnline

Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 2:42 PM
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Photos from the 10th anniversary of the RADAR launch event, Oxford Brookes University, 16 October 2019

Photos taken at the launch of RADAR on 16th October 2009. Presenters were Prof Rhona Sharpe, Dan Croft and Helen Workman. Photos by Bob Pomfret, Design and Media Services.

Access: openAccess
Type: image
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 2:24 PM
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Developing an initiative to involve service-users in the recruitment of student midwives

In this fourth article of our Advancing practice education series, a novel initiative regarding the engagement of service-users to student midwife recruitment is outlined. Whilst the NMC mandates service user involvement, it can be challenging to implement. We at Oxford Brookes University introduced an initiative involving group discussions between candidates and service users. Feedback was sought via an evaluation form which 68 candidates and six service users completed. Candidates enjoyed the opportunity to question mothers in an informal group setting, and women felt valued through sharing their stories and making a meaningful contribution to the recruitment process.

Access: metadataOnlyAccess
Type: journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 2:09 PM
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Reformulation of foods for weight loss: A focus on carbohydrates and fats

The Health Survey for England 2016 shows that the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing with 27% of adults being obese and 40% of men and 30% of women were overweight. As half of the UK population is expected to be obese by 2050, reformulation of food products can play a significant role in production of healthier foods with low energy density that can increase satiety and reduce food intake. Fat is the most energy-dense nutrient; hence it is a key area of reformulation for weight loss. The focus for reformulation in terms of fat is often on reducing saturated fat, but for weight loss overall fat reduction is the most important. This can be achieved through fat replacement products or altering the type of fats added to products to make them more satiating. Food reformulation in carbohydrate foods mainly involves reducing sugar and increasing fibre content. Considering that the current UK population has a high intake of sugars and low intake of fibre, reformulation strategies using bulk and intens…

Access: embargoedAccess
Type: book part
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 1:36 PM
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Language-games, geography, and making sense of the Arctic

Geography is closely tied to language: denominations, definitions, and metaphors are all part of conditioning spatial understandings. In recent years, critical geographers have also highlighted that there is much more to geography than its representation. One philosopher whose work centred on the relationship between language and practice, meaning and use, was Ludwig Wittgenstein. Yet, explicit engagement with his thought has been modest in geography. This article argues that Wittgenstein’s later philosophy of language offers useful contributions to the study of geography. It focuses on a space presently undergoing rapid “spatialisation”, the Arctic, and draws on articulations by Norwegian state personnel, policy papers, and speeches. Using Wittgenstein’s concept of “language-games”, the paper demonstrates how spatial understandings are closely tied to practice, while political practices themselves are as much about knowing how to use language. The aim here is neither to unmask any hidden meaning nor to arriv…

Access: embargoedAccess
Type: journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 1:13 PM
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Hithercroft Sports Ground football not happening

Access: openAccess
Type: sound
Status: Live|Last updated:October 17, 2019 12:14 PM
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