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Special Issue 12

Status: Live|Last updated:December 3, 2019 12:03 PM
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Status: Live|Last updated:December 2, 2019 8:42 AM
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Mimetic effect in mentoring: the contribution of shared transcendence values

Modelling in mentoring has been widely identified but the underlying mimetic process of how mentor qualities are reproduced in mentees is rarely explained. This article describes how a critical realist mixed methods case-study of Baptist ministers led to the development of a Resonance Model of Mimetic Effect in Mentoring depicting core conditions and drivers in the mimetic process. Mentor-mentee prioritising of God and transcendence values were found to particularly contribute to the generative mechanism in mimetic effect. Awareness of this powerful mimetic process is described as significant for equipping mentors to work in beneficial developmental ways with mentees.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:12 PM
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The client as a provider of developmental feedback for the executive coach

Formative feedback is likely to improve performance, which has encouraged executive coaches to seek accreditation and supervision. However, many coaches do not consider their clients as suitable providers of formative feedback, due, in part, to a lack of shared knowledge about effective behaviours. The study addressed the issue by developing a client behavioural feedback instrument for the executive coach. The article summarises the key findings of the mixed-methods approach which informed the instrument, highlighting differences and similarities with scales developed by accrediting bodies and experts.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:12 PM
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Client-led coaching? First-time coaching clients’ experience

This study investigates lived experiences of first-time coaching clients. Three clients of business coaching shared how they experienced their coachee role. Data was collected via participant-produced collage and in-depth interviews these visual and narrative data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis methodology to understand first-time client experiences. The coachee role embodies expression of the individuality of the client. Clients adopt an adaptive construct of learner role, employing both pedagogic and adult-learning concepts. Although unaware of their influence at the time of coaching, clients used the role of speaker to manage the narrative and to keep themselves psychologically safe.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:12 PM
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Insight events in coaching sessions

There is little research available that describes or gives a picture of what happens in a coaching session. This paper provides a view of the events containing insight within coaching sessions. Using the lived experiences of six coach/client dyads, themes emerged as to the structure of the significant moment and wider events, before, during and after insight manifestation. Approached from a critical realist underpinning synergised with a relativist empirical methodology, this research suggests that there is a coming together of both coach and client in a shared, mirrored and physiological moment.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:12 PM
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A Q Methodology Study: How Do Coaches Foster the Coaching Relationship?

There have been numerous studies which demonstrate the importance of the coaching relationship and its relevance in ensuring the successful outcome of the coaching process. However, there has been little exploration of the coach’s perspective; how do they make sense of their ability to foster coaching relationships in practice? Q-methodology was used to elicit possible meaning schemes that underpin this capability. Four distinct viewpoints were identified which provided the foundation for a ‘relationship styles framework’ that reflected the range of ways coaches work with complexity, ambiguity and holistic understanding in the management of coach client relations.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:12 PM
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Coaching during late career reinvention: The Discovering Model

Most of us will be living and working longer, but what if we want to do something very different during the later years of our working life? Research suggests that workers face unique issues in their late career, yet there is little formal research into career coaching experiences and implications for practice. Using grounded theory methodology, data was analysed from fourteen participants, (seven individuals who had reinvented their late career and seven coaches with extensive experience). Three main features emerged and form the basis of a practitioner model presented here. Potential implications for coaches have also been identified.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:12 PM
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How Shadow Coaching helps Leaders to Improve their Performance on the Job in Real-Time

Self-awareness is critical for leadership success. It not only builds and strengthens leadership skills, it also supports leaders’ creativity and innovation and helps increase the self-awareness of those around the leaders. This study, used the qualitative research approach Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to gain rich and in-depth knowledge of the lived experience of eleven leaders being shadow coached, a coaching intervention where coaches join clients in their work environment and help them to increase their performance on the spot. Leaders found that shadow coaching not only increased their self-awareness within a very short time frame, it also showed there was instant positive change in their attitude and leadership approach.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:11 PM
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The Manager as Coach and Facilitator of Development for Employees in Information Technology (IT)

This qualitative study explored managerial coaching to facilitate employee development within the Information Technology Department of a large UK Higher Education Institution. Its implications, however, are relevant to a variety of industries and organisations. A grounded theory approach explored employee lived experience. The findings both confirm and build on extant research, including desired managerial behaviours and characteristics. A coaching taxonomy is suggested that offers a way to provide adaptable, individualised support. Potential new insights into practical, collaborative, systematic promotion of workplace learning are offered through the creation of the Higher Education Development of Information Technology Staff (HEDITS) Framework, which proposes the centrality of a ‘living’ coaching ethos to underpin employee development.

Status: Live|Last updated:November 28, 2019 5:11 PM
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