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Dr Steenberg on Her Research into Gladiatorial Imagery in the Media

In this instalment, Lindsay Steenberg discusses her research into gladiatorial imagery in the media and the recent release of her book on the subject, Are You Not Entertained? Mapping the Gladiator in Visual Culture. She also guides the listener through the paradoxical pleasures of the contemporary action cinema as part of her new project on the fight scene. The film recommendations that Lindsay shared are: The Old Guard, Triple Threat, The Raid, The Raid 2, Shadow and Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. Dr Lindsay Steenberg, BA (hons), MA, PhD, Cert HEP, SFHEA Lindsay Steenberg is Reader in Film Studies at Oxford Brookes University where she co-ordinates their graduate programme in Popular Cinema. She has published numerous articles on violence and gender in postmodern and postfeminist media culture. She is the author of Forensic Science in Contemporary American Popular Culture: Gender, Crime, and Science and the recently published Are You Not Entertained? Mapping the Gladiator in Visual Culture, for which she…

Status: Live|Last updated:March 3, 2021 5:27 PM
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Oxford Brookes Unscripted

This podcast series from the Public Engagement Network (PEN) at Oxford Brookes University is a platform for academics, across all faculties, to informally share, discuss and contemplate their research with the wider community

Status: Live|Last updated:March 3, 2021 11:10 AM
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Europe Japan Research Centre Podcasts

For over two decades, the Europe-Japan Research Centre (EJRC) has brought distinguished guest speakers to Oxford to present on a broad range of topics in Japanese studies. From literature and film, to anthropology and religious studies, EJRC speakers showcase a range of perspectives on Japanese culture, revealing its complexity while making it accessible. The EJRC seminar series is supported by the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation.

Status: Live|Last updated:February 22, 2021 11:09 AM
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Fantastic Empire Science Writing and Science Fiction in Modern Japan, 1900-1937

Recorded 21 February 2019. Science fiction existed in Japanese since the early years after the Meiji Restoration (1868), but primarily as translations of Western canonical works. Between 1890 and 1910, new stories were written by Japanese authors, which quickly gained an enthusiastic audience. After WWI, however, popular scientific journals, catering to educated middle class readers and non-specialists, began publishing speculative science writing and science fantasy. Researchers, engineers, and technical specialists also were involved, both in the production and critique of these new visions of Japan's future. In this talk, Moore explores the intersection between fiction writing, imperial politics, and the dissemination of scientific knowledge. Using scientific studies to structure their imagination of possible futures, Japanese writers asked: what will space travel be like? Can we make artificial humans? Will super-weapons change the global political order? And what role will the Empire of Japan play in thi…

Status: Live|Last updated:February 20, 2021 1:44 PM
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High Speed Icons of Japan: Planes, Trains and Understanding Japanese Society

Recorded 28 November 2018. For over fifty years the shinkansen has been transporting people across Japan punctually, quickly, comfortably and safely. When it began services on 1 October 1964, in time for the Tōkyō Olympics, it heralded a new age in railway transport and since that time the shinkansen network has continued to grow with many changes since the break up and privatisation of the railways in 1987. Meanwhile the aviation market has also continued to evolve, with ANA becoming Japan’s biggest airline in recent years, the construction and expansion of airports, and the introduction of Low Cost Carriers. But there is more to these trains and planes than merely means of transportation; they also reflect a range of aspects of Japanese society. This paper will look at a range of issues relating to their design and usage that will reveal ways in which they can help us to understand Japanese society.

Status: Live|Last updated:February 20, 2021 1:41 PM
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“But now Japan and America are partners”: A further look into the 1964 special issue of Life magazine about Japan

Recorded 21 November 2018. September 1964, when the Tokyo Olympics were about to start, the reputed American middle-class- oriented Life magazine published a large special issue on Japan, teeming with superb photography and acutely written chronicles. Over the decades, it has become a sought-after collector’s item, especially cherished for a remarkable photographic piece on Tokyo’s underground music scene signed Michael Rougier. However, its interest goes beyond its graphic beauty, since this issue can easily be considered one of the most complex and illuminating documents on the convoluted relationship between Japan and the U.S. after World War II. The impassioned account of the economic miracle, the purposefully naive portrayal of Emperor Hirohito, the philosophical analysis of some of Japan’s most pervasive moral contradictions, the tender look on Tokyo’s distraught youth and the significant page layout and management of advertisements both to American and to Japanese brands are only some of the aspects th…

Status: Live|Last updated:February 20, 2021 1:39 PM
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Sekaigo - the international languages of Meiji Japan

Recorded 26 February 2020. Our understanding of language in Meiji Japan is chiefly focused upon the changes to the Japanese language itself: the creation of a central standardised Japanese and the relegation of regional variants to the status of dialects, as well as the simplification of grammar and the unification of spoken and written language. However, alongside this inward looking history, there is another, outward looking one: a history of debate about what the right language was for Japan to use to talk to the rest of world. This history features a range of unfamiliar languages: Volapuk, Esperanto, Zilengo, and Yokohama Kotoba, and reveals an important but forgotten dimension to Japan’s modernity.

Status: Live|Last updated:February 20, 2021 1:34 PM
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What is IDOL in Japan? From a viewpoint of sociology of fan culture

Recorded 17 October 2018. Ordinary, Japanese idol means young boys/girls groups which is constructed by singers, actors and TV talents. In these days, it is said that idol is one of the typical Japanese pop culture. They look really good-looking and cute. On the other hand, it is said that almost all of them don’t have a great talent for singing, dancing and acting, especially comparing to Star singers or Movie Stars. For a long time, idol has been criticized as incomprehensible culture by the people who likes traditional and authentic cultures. But there are so many fans in Japan. And they enthusiastically love these idols. Therefore, in this presentation, I would like to understand this typical Japanese pop culture from a viewpoint of sociology of fan culture. From this point of view, we can understand they love idol as a culture of communication rather than a culture of content.

Status: Live|Last updated:February 20, 2021 1:32 PM
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Monks, Monasteries and Mental Institutions On the Intriguing Connections Between Buddhism and the Care for the Insane in Pre-Modern and Modern Japan

Recorded 20 March 2019. This talk explores the intersections between Buddhism/Buddhist institutions and madness/mental institutions. After a general discussion of the place of madness within the Buddhist tradition I will move to the intriguing history of the institutional connections between Buddhist monasteries and mental institutions in Japan. What, I will ask, is the historical relationship between the Buddhist monasteries and the new mental hospitals, which often grew up within the precincts or adjacent to Buddhist monasteries? In addressing this questions we encounter a history of the fundamental role played by Buddhist monasteries in the therapy of those beset with mental illnesses. Due to modern changes in the care for the insane—including a move toward mandatory hospitalization— the earlier history of the connections between the Buddhist monasteries and the insane became occluded. This talk will recover some of that history and show the role that was played by Buddhist temples in providing therapies, …

Status: Live|Last updated:February 20, 2021 1:29 PM
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Inside, Outside, In-between: Elderly ex-offenders and the politics of exclusion

Recorded 6 November 2019. Following decades of low fertility and long average lifespans, Japan's aging society is currently undergoing a social and demographic transformation on a scale never before seen in human history. Concerns about the care of Japan's aging population has concentrated either on the provision of formal care services through the Long-Term Care Insurance system or on the support of unpaid family and community carers. But what about older people who fall through the social 'safety net' of care? For more and more older people, one consequence of the Japan's aging society has been an increased risk of going to prison, usually as a result of minor nonviolent property crimes. As the prison population ages, guards and fellow prisoners become care assistants, while facilities, daily routines, food, and even the architecture of prisons are all become adapted to the older body. In many ways, it appears that in the aging society, prisons become nursing homes. This talk examines the lifeworlds of olde…

Status: Live|Last updated:February 20, 2021 1:14 PM
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